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Select a body part below to find out more about the effects of alcohol on your health.

Reproductive

Men may suffer temporary impotence – brewers’ droop – after a bout of drinking. Long-term heavy drinking can cause the sexual organs to shrink in men and women.

Drinking can also increase sexual risk taking that can lead to sexually transmitted infections.

Liver

Most alcohol that goes into your body is processed by your liver, and if it has to break down too much alcohol the health of your liver will suffer.

Long-term, drinking too much alcohol can lead to fatty liver, hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) and cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and also liver cancer.

Stomach

Drinking too much can cause gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining) and stomach ulcers. It can also lead to uncomfortable reflux – digestive being forced up into your oesophagus (food pipe).

Heavy drinking can also increase your risk of stomach and bowel cancer.

Heart

In spite of media stories about red wine being good for your heart, there’s no decent evidence to back that up. What we do know is that drinking too much can raise your blood pressure and so raise your risk of heart disease.

Mouth and throat

If you drink regularly above the recommended amount you are increasing the risk of developing cancer of the mouth, larynx (voice box), pharynx (upper throat) and oesophagus (food pipe). This risk increases further if you smoke.

Brain

The immediate effects of drinking on your brain can include slurred speech, slow reactions, impaired memory and blackouts. Over the longer term, heavy drinking can cause a number of different types of brain damage.

Brain Brain
Larynx Larynx
Heart Heart
Stomach Stomach
Liver Liver
Reproductive Reproductive
Figure

Reproductive

Men may suffer temporary impotence – brewers’ droop – after a bout of drinking. Long-term heavy drinking can cause the sexual organs to shrink in men and women.

Drinking can also increase sexual risk taking that can lead to sexually transmitted infections.

1.

Liver

Most alcohol that goes into your body is processed by your liver, and if it has to break down too much alcohol the health of your liver will suffer.

Long-term, drinking too much alcohol can lead to fatty liver, hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) and cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and also liver cancer.

2.

Stomach

Drinking too much can cause gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining) and stomach ulcers. It can also lead to uncomfortable reflux – digestive being forced up into your oesophagus (food pipe).

Heavy drinking can also increase your risk of stomach and bowel cancer.

3.

Heart

In spite of media stories about red wine being good for your heart, there’s no decent evidence to back that up. What we do know is that drinking too much can raise your blood pressure and so raise your risk of heart disease.

4.

Mouth and throat

If you drink regularly above the recommended amount you are increasing the risk of developing cancer of the mouth, larynx (voice box), pharynx (upper throat) and oesophagus (food pipe). This risk increases further if you smoke.

5.

Brain

The immediate effects of drinking on your brain can include slurred speech, slow reactions, impaired memory and blackouts. Over the longer term, heavy drinking can cause a number of different types of brain damage.

6.

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